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Music Technology KS5

£75.00

Music Technology KS5 will ensure students understand the principles of sound and audio technology and how they are used in creative and professional practice. It introduces a wide range of recording and production techniques and how they are used in practice for both corrective and creative purposes.

Description

Music Technology KS5

Objectives and aims:

Our Music Technology KS5 solution meets the needs to develop understanding, skills and knowledge required for students at KS5 level. We incorporate fun and intriguing technologies to teach some of the toughest music technology elements. Music Technology KS5 will ensure students understand the principles of sound and audio technology and how they are used in creative and professional practice. It introduces a wide range of recording and production techniques and how they are used in practice for both corrective and creative purposes. Students develop recording skills to demonstrate an understanding of sound and its capture. Student develop an understanding of the historical and cultural contexts of the use of technology in the creation, performance and production of music. Students learn to make links between the integrated activities of recording, processing, mixing, sound-creation and creative music technology applications, underpinned by analytical listening. Students understand the basic principles of acoustics, psycho-acoustics, and the digitalisation of sound. Students develop the skills required to manage music technology projects from inception to completion, by evaluating and refining recordings and technology-based compositions over extended periods of time.

Music Technology KS5 Contents:

Recording and Production Techniques for both corrective and creative purposes

Students develop knowledge and understanding for corrective and creative purposes of:

  • software and hardware
  • capture of sound
  • sequencing and MIDI
  • audio editing
  • EQ
  • dynamic processing
  • effects
  • balance and blend
  • stereo
  • synthesis
  • sampling
  • automation
  • pitch and rhythm correction and manipulation
  • mastering

Software and hardware:

  • the core functions of a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) detailed below in this table
  • a range of hardware including microphones and audio interfaces
  • the advanced functions of a Digital Audio Workstation (DAW) detailed below in this table
  • other programming environments and new and emerging software
  • the impact of new and emerging software on music production

Capture of sound:

  • the identification and use of NOT, Schmitt inverter and 2 and 3 input AND, NAND, OR, NOR, XNOR and XOR logic gates, singly and in combination
  • gain-structure and how it affects noise and distortion
  • the characteristics and suitability of microphone types e.g. dynamic, condenser
  • the suitability of microphone techniques e.g. distances
  • the advantages and disadvantages of microphone types in terms of polar pattern and frequency response
  • advanced microphone techniques e.g. coincident pair
  • how microphones work including microphone sensitivity, electromagnetic induction and capacitance

Sequencing:

  • real time input
  • step input
  • quantise
  • velocity and note length
  • how MIDI and/or OSC works by studying data bytes
  • data bytes including note on, pitch, controllers, pitch bend LSB and MSB

Audio Editing:

  • truncating
  • how to remove clicks and noise.
  • how and why clicks and noise occur e.g. discontinuous waveforms

EQ:

  • different types of EQ in a recording e.g. low-shelf, highshelf, band, LPF, HPF
  • how different parameters affect sound
  • how to draw graphs of EQ, e.g. Q, gain, frequency

Dynamic Processing:

  • different uses of compression and gating
  • how to adjust threshold and ratio on a compressor in a recording
  • how to use advanced parameters of a compressor e.g. attack, release, knee, sidechain
  • how to draw graphs of compression and gating

Effects:

  • reverb, delay, flange, chorus phaser, wah-wah and distortion in a recording
  • the core parameters including reverb time and delay time.
  • effects including ADT and autotune
  • detailed parameters including reverb pre-delay time and delay feedback

Balance and blend

  • the relative balance of parts (tracks, instruments and/or vocals)
  • how blend is affected by compression, EQ and effects

Stereo

  • how to identify pan positions of individual parts (tracks, instruments and/or vocals) in a recording
  • panning law, mono-summing and mid-side processing

Synthesis

  • how synthesis is used to create different sounds by using oscillators, filters, envelopes and LFOs
  • how timbre is affected by a wider variety of parameters e.g. cut-off frequency, resonance, attack, decay, sustain, release, graphs, and mapping of envelopes to filter cut-off frequency

Sampling

  • pitch mapping, cutting/trimming and looping
  • the use of samples in new contexts to create new meanings or effect
  • sample rate, bit-depth, other synthesis parameters e.g. filter and envelope

Automation

  • how to use volume and pan automation
  • how to automate parameters of plug-ins e.g. cut-off frequency, delay feedback

Pitch and Rhythm correction and manipulation

  • how to correct inaccuracies in pitch and rhythm e.g. by retuning a vocal part or tightening the rhythm in a drum part.
  • the parameters that allow greater control and creativity e.g. response time, transient detection threshold and groove templates

Mastering

  • limiting and perceived volume
  • parameters e.g. limiter gain
  • understanding how EQ works in the mastering process

Acoustics

  • how the live room acoustics affect the recording
  • acoustics including describing a reverb tail e.g. pre-delay time, early reflections and reverberation time

Monitor Speakers

  • the characteristics of different monitor speakers e.g. woofer, tweeter
  • how monitor speakers work (electromagnetic induction)
  • different types of monitor speakers and how they affect mix-translation

Leads

  • how leads and connectivity work including signal path, signal types
  • the different types and uses of leads including jack and XLR
  • how leads and connectivity work including impedance
  • the advantages and disadvantages of different leads and connectivity

Digital and Analogue

  • the differences between digital and analogue recordings
  • the advantages and disadvantages of digital and analogue recordings
  • the specifications of digital and analogue recordings and how they affect sound quality e.g. A/D and D/A conversion, tape, vinyl and streaming

Numeracy

  • how to display information graphically e.g. in waveforms and EQ curves
  • how to interpret graphs e.g. frequency response graphs and polar response graphs, to understand how sound quality is affected
  • technical numeracy including binary, formulae, logarithms, and how they are used in music technology
  • how to make calculations to describe sound waves including waveforms, frequency, phase and amplitude

Levels

  • principles of levels and metering including management of levels to prevent distortion and maximise signal to noise ratio
  • levels and metering including dB scales, psycho-acoustics, and when to use different scales including peak and RMS

Development of recording and production technology

  • direct to tape and mono recording (c.1950 – 1963)
  • early multitrack (c.1964 – 1969)
  • large scale analogue multitrack (c.1969 – 1995)
  • digital recording and sequencing (c.1980 – present day)
  • digital audio workstations (DAW) and emerging technologies (c.1996 – present day)

Students learn how recording technology has been used to create and shape sound, in relation to electric and electronic instruments, multi-track recording and equipment, samplers, synthesisers and DAW.

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