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Character Development In Animated Shows2018-07-06T12:28:24+01:00

Ioteach (home) Forums Technology Character Development In Animated Shows

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    • Khurram Wariskhurram waris
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      I ran across this a few days ago and my mind started wandering:

      http://mentalfloss.com/article/62035/chuck-jones-rules-writing-road-runner-cartoons

      There were 9 “rules” the coyote had to abide by in the old Road Runner/Wile E. Coyote cartoons.

      Now, the animation has obviously progressed over the years. My question is, do makers of animated shows/films put as much work in character development as they do animation development? Or do you think the plots and the intracacies of the characters are still as simple as “The 9 Rules” while the animation visually blows you away?

      K Waris

    • Khurram Wariskhurram waris
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      The business has changed a great deal since the beginning days of Wile E. Coyote, but I think for any type of story, complex or simple, it’s very beneficial to have something like the “9 Rules” Chuck Jones set for the Road Runner cartoons. I don’t think more complex writing methods leave them behind, but it’s easier for individuals or small teams to home-brew an impressive film than ever before, let alone for any company to make one. Because of that, we’re seeing more stories with simpler character writing since in many cases it no longer requires a burning, well articulated desire to see their ideas come to life.

      On the other hand, a lot of modern films seem to follow a simple set of rules that are nearly never broken, even by the most amateur or avant garde, at least not all at once. The “nine rules” principal  can be applied to individual characters, the cast on the whole, or even just the presentation. These aren’t even necessarily hard fast, but these rules have a goal in mind, and if they are broken, what breaks them should maintain the spirit of the initial rules or feed into the greater themes of whatever you’re writing.

      K Waris

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